Parent-child Interaction Therapy: Large Effectiveness

Large effectiveness: 1.14

What is Parent-child Interaction Therapy?

1. Teaches authoritative parenting, which combines warm, nurturing support and age-johann-walter-bantz-216960-unsplashappropriate limits.

2. Draws on both attachment and social learning theories.

3. For young children with behavioral and emotional disorders that places emphasis on improving the quality of the parent-child relationship and changing parent-child interaction patterns.

4. Most commonly treats oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, and ADHD, (talking back to significant acts of aggression)

5. Play therapy followed by reminders for parents to: describe child’s actions, reflect oncaroline-hernandez-177784-unsplash what child says, imitate play of child, praise child’s positive actions, enjoy special time.

6. Avoids: questions, commands, and criticism.

7. Ignores attention-seeks behavior that is destructive or aggressive.

8. Short-term

 

Evidence:

1.65 large effect: reduced externalizing behavior problems (physical aggression, disobeying rules, cheating, stealing, and destruction of property) in children (Ward, Theule, & Cheung, 2016)

1.39 large effect: more effective than control group that did not receive treatment (Ward, Theule, & Cheung, 2016)

0.52 moderate effect: reduced physical abuse recurrence (Kennedy, Kim, Tripodi, Brown, & Gowdy, 2016)

0.31 small effect: reduced child abuse potential (Kennedy, Kim, Tripodi, Brown, & Gowdy, 2016)

0.35 small effect: reduced parenting stress (Kennedy, Kim, Tripodi, Brown, & Gowdy, 2016)

0.89 large effect: reduced externalizing behavior problems in preschoolers (Graziano, Ros, Hart, & Slavec, 2017)

1.88 large effect: reduced frequency of disruptive behaviors in children as reported by father (Abrahamse, Junger, Chavannes, Coelman, Boer, & Lindauer, 2012)

1.99 large effect: reduced frequency of disruptive behaviors in children as reported by mother (Abrahamse, Junger, Chavannes, Coelman, Boer, & Lindauer, 2012)

1.28 large effect: reduced depression severity in preschoolers (Lenze, Pautsch, & Luby, 2011)

 


 

Abrahamse, M. E., Junger, M., Chavannes, E. L., Coelman, F. G., Boer, F., & Lindauer, R. L. (2012). Parent–child interaction therapy for preschool children with disruptive behaviour problems in the Netherlands. Child And Adolescent Psychiatry And Mental Health, 6 doi:10.1186/1753-2000-6-24

Graziano, P. A., Ros, R., Hart, K. C., & Slavec, J. (2017). Summer treatment program for preschoolers with externalizing behavior problems: A preliminary examination of parenting outcomes. Journal Of Abnormal Child Psychology, doi:10.1007/s10802-017-0358-6

Lenze, S. N., Pautsch, J., & Luby, J. (2011). Parent-child interaction therapy emotion development: A novel treatment for depression in preschool children. Depression and Anxiety, 28(2), 153-159. doi:10.1002/da.20770

Kennedy, S. C., Kim, J. S., Tripodi, S. J., Brown, S. M., & Gowdy, G. (2016). Does parent–child interaction therapy reduce future physical abuse? A meta-analysis. Research On Social Work Practice, 26(2), 147-156. doi:10.1177/1049731514543024

Ward, M. A., Theule, J., & Cheung, K. (2016). Parent–child interaction therapy for child disruptive behaviour disorders: A meta-analysis. Child & Youth Care Forum, 45(5), 675-690. doi:10.1007/s10566-016-9350-5

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s